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BlueberryMuffins76
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on: February 07, 2015 06:11
Congrats, Lily!!! (May I call you that? I'm Blue, anyway!)
While college is hard, I think in some ways being homeschooled makes it easier, although I'm not sure how. But it's definitely a hard transition! Dual enrollment was helpful so I could experience a college class without actually going through the whole college deal (if that makes sense). Really one of the very hardest things was getting up early for an 8am class! That meant I had to get up 2 hours beforehand to be ready in time, not fun for a night owl like me!
"Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends." John 15:13, NIV I'm a fanfiction writer and appreciate reviews! Check me out at https://www.fanfiction.net/u/6434280/BlueberryMuffins76
Huddy
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on: February 10, 2015 01:59
Greetings All! Another homeschooler signing in!
findemaxam48
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on: February 12, 2015 04:49
Can homeschooling allow you to graduate early?
We were one in the same, running like moths to the flame. You'd hang on every word I'd say, but now they only ricochet.
Eruwestiel_Evensong
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on: February 12, 2015 06:02
Maxie, it sure can! You can graduate at any age as long as you have the proper amount of credits (at least that's how it is here). I am graduating a year late, but I know more than one person who graduated a year early.
One of the many things I love about homeschool - the flexibility.

Besides the basics, you can study whatever you want, whenever you want to. That is why I have studied the science behind fishkeeping and have a 55 gallon aquarium in my room, learned gardening hands on, worked on calligraphy, and will learn beekeeping this year. So many options! I just feel that there are so many things you can learn about life and the world that you may not be able to in a classroom setting. That is not to say that schools do not have their place - just our schools here are usually not very good.
"And I dreamed of seas and ships, and of waves crashing on the shore in the twilight of the world..." ~Song, member of the Realm of Ulmo
BlueberryMuffins76
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on: February 12, 2015 09:10
It's the same way where I am, Song! I technically graduated a year early because I have a spring birthday, but I know someone else who just graduated high school this fall & she was technically a good half-year late, perhaps 1.5 years. What was probably the very best thing about the flexibility for me was PE in high school; I took a co-op class & the first semester we did a different activity each week, from yoga to line dancing. I'm not a fan of ball games & freak out when one heads my way, so I would not have done well in an actual school.
"Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends." John 15:13, NIV I'm a fanfiction writer and appreciate reviews! Check me out at https://www.fanfiction.net/u/6434280/BlueberryMuffins76
findemaxam48
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on: February 13, 2015 12:12
Just wondering. I could technically graduate at the end of my sophomore year, because I have enough credits from taking classes a year early, as well. So I could have been going to college as a 16 year old. But I decided to stick around, and I am now raking in college credits. It looks like I may have two semesters of college, or at least a semester and a half, done by the time I graduate high school about a year and four months from now.
We were one in the same, running like moths to the flame. You'd hang on every word I'd say, but now they only ricochet.
BlueberryMuffins76
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on: February 14, 2015 07:18
Nice! I only had one college class under my belt when I actually started as a freshman. But just having that one class out of the way was a huge blessing; it was biology, so of course it had actual class time & lab time. I have no idea how I would have worked that into my college schedule since I had to commute 45 minutes one way to get there every single day, so scheduling things was a pain Not to mention the fact that I'm not a science person & insides gross me out lol
"Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends." John 15:13, NIV I'm a fanfiction writer and appreciate reviews! Check me out at https://www.fanfiction.net/u/6434280/BlueberryMuffins76
findemaxam48
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on: February 15, 2015 11:04
Well, homeschool or not, I do not think that anyone would argue that getting college credit for cheap or for free is a bad thing.
We were one in the same, running like moths to the flame. You'd hang on every word I'd say, but now they only ricochet.
elfmaiden77
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on: February 15, 2015 12:46
Wow. There are so many homeschooled lotr fans! This is great! I have been homeschooled all my life, and am in eighth grade.
Gnomie
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on: March 23, 2015 09:05
I was homeschooled too. I finished just this year and I am now studying part time in visual arts.
RohanPrincess19
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on: July 07, 2015 12:52
Hi! I am also homeschooled.
Elfeawen Lomiondil
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on: September 25, 2015 03:47
I am surprised and happy to meet so many homeschoolers here. I never darkened the door of a school until my first day of college. I have talked to friends who were not homeschooled, and in general, I feel I was better prepared for some aspects of college because studying at home taught me self discipline and self motivation. The things that were a bit hard for me but normal to them were getting up early for an early class or staying up late to study, and dealing with deadlines. I've never missed a deadline, but I think I still stress about them more. If given the choice, I'd do it again, no question.
"There shall be war between the Children of Iluvatar and the Ainu Melko. What if we perish in our quest? The dark halls of Vê be little worse than this bright prison" ~ Fëanor
Elweth
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on: September 25, 2015 04:13
Hello there, fellow homeschoolers! I'm so happy I *finally* found this thread.

I was homeschooled pretty much my whole grade school education. My mother set a rigorous but fair schedule for my siblings and me - we had to be ready for "school" by a certain time, had regular tests and quizzes, and took classes through a local co-op. By high school we were essentially teaching ourselves college-level courses with the occasional pop quizzes and tests provided by our mother. I worked ahead one summer and finished a year early so my sister and I could graduate together.

Like many of you, my first real experience with "real school" was college. Attending classes, developing relationships with new classmates and professors each semseter/year was challenging, but I felt my homeschool education prepared me well for the academic aspect(s).

I always find it interesting to see people's reactions when they find out I was homeschooled. Anything from "Oh, that's fantastic. You're so lucky. No wonder you're so smart!" to "...Oh..." Of course, I always enjoy disproving the homeschooler stereotypes.

[Edited on 09/26/2015 by Elweth]
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Gandolorin
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on: September 26, 2015 02:46
I, not being home-schooled in any formal way (perhaps except for being a voracious reader, which goes more in the direction of self-schooling - and the vast majority of that far after my formal schooling) have questions about how home-schooling can work. Now in Germany, it may be almost impossible except for rare occasions. But home-schooling must mean home-teaching.
So my first question is:
With more and more families depending on income from both parents (respectively people who have not become parents because even two incomes are not sufficient - and never mind two or more jobs being necessary ...), home schooling meaning home teaching must mean families being able to get along with one income earner; and I'm NOT taking bets on whether the income earner is mom or dad.
Second question:
I graduated from a high school in Port Washington, on the north shore of Long Island, NY, in 1973. I did NOT take the top-level courses in the sciences at the time, but I know what was required in the courses I did take. Any parent able to teach their children up to a level to pass the SAT's - I had 680 / 750 back then - (or in NY state, the Regent's exams), i.e. college level, would have to have quite a vast knowledge. Or at least (old chestnut: you do not need to know everything, much better to know where to look it up ...) have vast resources and know how to use them.
This is not the third question, rather a puzzled observation from the time we were able to receive (on German cable TV, which very likely is very different from US cable TV) the Tonight Show with Jay Leno. He had this bit called "Jaywalking", where he interviewed people; including college students (this may have been in California, I'm not sure ...); the answers were often so catastrophic that was tempted to guess what year in high school (occasionally junior high) Jay had picked on to confuse us.
Maybe the people Jay Leno interviewed were not home-schooled. Very likely, I would guess, as the proportion of people home-schooled in the college crowd is anything but a majority.
And now I may have a third question:
how many home-schooled people FAILED to get into college (with SAT's and similar stuff perhaps standing in the way?)
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Durin-The-Deathless
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on: September 30, 2015 02:15
hey. homeschooled and bored XD
Dolwen
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on: October 01, 2015 08:19
Hi Gando, being a homeschool parent I can answer your questions from my standpoint and my situation is similar to a lot of other homeschool families I know...

Income: we are most definitely a single income family, my husband making a decent wage. We go without many (IMO- unnecessary) things to be able to do this such as cable television, expensive clothing, car payments, frequent dinners out, credit cards etc. Not that we are destitute by any means but we are smart with our money and live on a budget. I am sure there are some families that both parents work and both help educate their children. One of the beauties of homeschooling is that you can set your own schedule. Many families choosing to school year round combined with only teaching a couple of kids vs. a room full, lesson go much quicker. My kids are older (middle and high school aged)they spend 3-4 hours a day/ 5 days a week on school and we take the summers off. Compared to the 7 hours a day plus homework for public school kids.

It is not necessary for the parents to have a vast knowledge to successfully teach their high schoolers to get into college. We use purchased homeschool curriculum or use a combination of different curricula and can add other sources to teach each subject and many high school students do independent study as well. You would probably be surprised at the statistics of homeschoolers success in college. A homeschool high school plan is tailored to the needs and interests of your child and what they intend to do so in a lot of ways it is much better than a one size fits all high school plan. Many homeschoolers exceed the credits that are earned in high school and also take AP classes. In Florida, both public school and homeschool can dual enroll, meaning that they take part of their course load at a high school level and the other at the local state college and have graduated high school with 2 year degrees. Just like with public school it depends on the child and their goal, not every child is college bound in either setting so I am sure that there are some (just like public schoolers) who fail to get into college. This article is about 5 years old but it shows the success of homeschoolers compared to public schoolers: http://www.hslda.org/docs/media/2010/201008030.asp



[Edited on 10/01/2015 by Dolwen]
Evil~Shieldmaiden
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on: October 02, 2015 02:54
I find your statistical information interesting Dolwen. I've noticed that a large number of the members of this site are being home schooled and, overall, they're a pretty impressive bunch.

I have found them to be universally curious, quick and enthusiastic when it comes to learning new things. Although I hadn't thought much about home schooling, I am a convert. The only concern I would have would be peer socialisation which can be easily dealt with by engaging in a variety of activities such as sports.

As for Durin the Deathless' comment: IMHO you should NEVER be bored and, if you are, you have nobody to blame but yourself Let your curiosity guide you and you will find many new things to explore and excite you.
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Gandolorin
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on: October 02, 2015 04:42
I don't know if THIS Friday is the best occasion for such ruminations, but the odd thought has been creeping up on me.

As I mentioned above, in Germany, home-schooling may be almost impossible except for rare occasions, whatever they may be. But there is a difference outside of the direct school environment which does make a major difference: The households in which the children grow up, and I'll guess that this is also not irrelevant in the U.S. Parents being role models for curiosity, interested in education as a means to get ahead, sometimes, simply there being (enough) books in the household. If this is the case, the children are simply motivated by the example of their parents (OK, in puberty this may not be true, and if manure happens ...).

The thing I'm getting at is the support for any kind of schooling at home. If parents decide to try home-schooling, one should assume a very high level of support. Again, doing it in Germany to that formal degree is unlikely, but the informal support is not to be neglected. It may actually be decisive.

Unless every statistic here is a lie, it IS decisive.

[Edited on 10/02/2015 by Gandolorin]
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Estelanor Of The Shire
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on: October 02, 2015 02:58
I was home-schooled until I started college at age 17. Transitioning to a classroom environment was much easier than I had thought it would be, and overall I enjoy the challenges and adventures that come with college life. I also appreciated being home-schooled, and I'm grateful to my parents for making that commitment.

I am now a junior, working towards a bachelors degree in geography (and in one of my geography classes we read scholarly articles on the geography of Middle Earth).

As Evil-Shieldmaiden suggested, I agree (from my experience) that peer socialization is the biggest draw back of home-schooling. Growing up, most of my friends were adults (Not that there is anything wrong with adults;D, especially now that I am one). But if families could live in communities with lots of other kids, I don't think that would be much of a problem.

[Edited on 10/03/2015 by Estelanor Of The Shire]
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lizandroll_the_troll
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on: October 03, 2015 08:46
Hello All,

I was homeschooled from 3rd grade through high school. It was definitely an interesting experience! Like anything in life, there were things which were great and other things that were not ideal--but they have not hindered me in any way. In fact, unique challenges demand creative solutions!

My parents made homeschooling work on a single income even when that income was minuscule. It required sacrifices, but they were willing to pay that cost for what they believed in. In those days, we started with curricula which was created for the classroom, but as my mom became more comfortable with the art of homeschooling and the freedom it offered, we branched out. Now, I am amazed at the plentiful, quality materials available to homeschoolers. My younger sisters are doing work and have the opportunity for classes I only dreamed of.... and satisfied by reading everything I could find. (: Homeschooling can be intensely strenuous and academic. The growth of homeschooling has really allowed parents to network and enroll their children in classes taught by people well-qualified. I took chemistry from a homeschooling mom who was an actual chemist. The explosion of homeschooling gives great opportunity for socialization and learning in a "class" environment. While I grew up in a tiny town, my younger sisters are getting to experience homeschooling as part of a vibrant community in a big city.

I went to college and found I was better prepared for the rigors than many students there. I accepted that I was going to college to "work"--not party/have the best years of my life. College wasn't freedom from the high school years of always being told what to do; college was a choice to study, a gift of knowledge offered if I would attain it. I graduated with honors and an embarrassingly great GPA because I focused on the strengths homeschooling gave me: curiosity, good work ethic, and encouragement to follow my passions.

Right after college, I got a great job teaching in a public school. I'm still learning, curious, desirous to extend my knowledge in areas I feel weak, and grateful I've been shown to be a "lifelong learner."
Dolwen
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on: October 07, 2015 11:15
Actually, socialization isn't as big of a problem as most assume. That is usually the number one question when someone says they homeschool. I suppose in some rural areas it might be more of a challenge but from my experience there are tons of opportunities to get with other kids if one takes advantage of them. There is a decent size homeschool community where we live and lots of get togethers, field trips and co-op classes. My youngest goes to a weekly archery club, monthly teen group and monthly roller skating and also gets together with friends outside of these scheduled activities and there is much more available. My older son isn't a social butterfly and prefers to just hang out with his handful of close friends rather than do a bunch of activities. IMO and meaning no offense, I don't count socialization in the public school system to be a good thing. My oldest child had a public education and for my younger two, the older one was public school through 5th and my younger through 3rd so I have seen and heard first hand what goes on in these schools and on the buses and I don't count that kind of "socialization" to be desirable and in fact, is one of the many reasons we decided to homeschool.

As far as support in homeschooling, there are tons of resources for that too. We have a local yahoo group and a local facebook group for not only setting up field trips and group activities but for getting help and support. We also have a local homeschool guru that knows all the ins and outs and has a website and blog. Not to mention the vast amount of websites and forums dedicated to homeschooling where one can find the answer to every question imaginable. We also have the HSLDA which has tons of information and the laws for every state.
Gandolorin
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on: October 09, 2015 05:22
From the posts, I take away one impression: home schooling indicates a very high interest by the teacher-parents to give their children good schooling.

As I mentioned above, that interest (or for some children unfortunately lack of it) by the parents also plays a very large part in our German school system, a decisive part, even. Those with a lack of interest would not opt for homeschooling, even if it were allowed here.

A question has been popping up in my mind: does the apparently high level of homeschooling (and we must take into account that in this thread the home-schooled will be represented to a much higher degree than in the general population) also say something about the unsatisfactory results achieved in the public school system? And if so, why is that so - though with the schools being financed at a local level, the question becomes pretty much rhetorical. And I'm not even going to start about the prep-schools, Andover and Exeter were two names I heard very often in the Ivy League college I went to (but did not graduate from).

There is one aspect of homeschooling which I consider to be entirely negative: when parents use it to shelter their children from teaching, pretty much entirely in the sciences, that these parents do not approve of. This may sound harsh, but that is no different to what the Nazis in Germany did when they were able to control what pupils were allowed to learn; that's totalitarianism (and yes, there are some religious trends that I consider to be no better than Hitlerism and Stalinism).

To foster curiosity is the best thing any teacher can impart to a student. From somewhere, I also remember the following: it is not so important to find answers (which are often temporary anyway) but to continue to ask the right questions.
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Dolwen
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on: October 11, 2015 04:51
A question has been popping up in my mind: does the apparently high level of homeschooling also say something about the unsatisfactory results achieved in the public school system?

I would say definitely. Though it isn't all necessarily about results but the overall education, environment and influences the child received in public school. As I said above, public school education is one size fits all. I would think results such as test scores and the like have less to do with it than the other things I have mentioned. Many homeschooler (though not by any means all) also choose to educate at home because of religious reasons such as being free to teach from a religious worldview instead of strictly a secular one.

There is one aspect of homeschooling which I consider to be entirely negative: when parents use it to shelter their children from teaching, pretty much entirely in the sciences, that these parents do not approve of.


With the exception of Darwinian evolution, I have never heard of a homeschool family that has refused to teach the sciences for religious reasons. Though I am sure there are some obscure cults out there that do, please don't assume that anyone who teaches their children from a religious world view does this; it just isn't accurate. Religion and science aren't enemies as most assume. I can't speak for everyone but most Christians would teach from a creation standpoint, though that doesn't mean that they don't teach what Darwinian evolution is or says (though you won't find a single public school that even touches on creationism). As far as I am aware that is the one and only area of science that religious people disagree with. I find it strange that you mention totalitarianism when speaking of homeschool when in reality public schools fit the definition so closely that it is frightening.



[Edited on 10/11/2015 by Dolwen]
Gandolorin
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on: October 11, 2015 07:08
Dolwen said: ... With the exception of Darwinian evolution, I have never heard of a homeschool family that has refused to teach the sciences for religious reasons. ... I find it strange that you mention totalitarianism when speaking of homeschool when in reality public schools fit the definition so closely that it is frightening.


I graduated from high school in Port Washington on the North Shore of Long Island, Nassau County, NY, back in 1973. If public schools have changed so much that you consider them examples of totalitarianism, that would frighten me too. What aspects of the current public schools lead you to this alarming opinion?

I am definitely not equating homeschool with totalitarianism, anything but that. But there are forms of fundamentalist religion - probably what you mean with (small?) sects - claiming to Christian, or Muslim, or Hindu or ... which are quite definitely totalitarian, and homeschool in such an environment is something I find distressing to think about.

And while of course Darwin is the "Devil's Chaplain" (title of an eminently readable book by Richard Dawkins) for many, Darwinian evolution is by no means the only science incompatible with some belief forms. "Young-earth creationism" would very certainly be incompatible with astronomy, geology and archeology, at the least. And the the "young earthers" are not a small sect, from what I know.

[Edited on 10/11/2015 by Gandolorin]
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Gandolorin
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on: October 11, 2015 08:26
Agreed, our forums are the wrong ... well, forum is the only term I can come up with ... for such a discussion. But PMs? Just a suggestion.
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Dolwen
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on: October 11, 2015 08:37
PMs are perfectly fine. To be on the safe side, I think I will delete my previous post.

[Edited on 10/11/2015 by Dolwen]
Hawkins
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on: December 25, 2016 11:00
I've been homeschooled all the way to college and I loved it!!!
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on: January 04, 2017 03:50
That's awesome! I've also been homeschooled my whole life, and I'm currently in 11th grade.
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Hanasian
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on: January 06, 2017 06:52
Gandolorin said:And while of course Darwin is the "Devil's Chaplain" (title of an eminently readable book by Richard Dawkins) for many, Darwinian evolution is by no means the only science incompatible with some belief forms. "Young-earth creationism" would very certainly be incompatible with astronomy, geology and archeology, at the least. And the the "young earthers" are not a small sect, from what I know.


No, not small. Having been part of educating two of my three kids via homeschool up to 6th grade, and having spent considerable time in 'homeschool support groups' for parents, I came to the conclusion that in what seemed to be a majority of cases, homeschooling is done by religious parents trying to instill in their children their own religious beliefs and biases such as what you mention. It's kind of like programming of raw young minds. to perpetuate the mythos.
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fool_of_a_took_12
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on: June 04, 2018 10:59
Hi! I was homeschooled up to grade 5, and it was great! I got a wonderful education from my mother, and have been ahead in school since then.
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Lydwina Marie
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on: June 05, 2018 01:06
Another homeschooler signing in!
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