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TheOrangeblossom
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Post RE: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: January 20, 2010 07:58
When I read this I get a feeling that it has to be hard work to read Silmarillion, and I think it is a pity if you think so. Do not read it as a school book, with a lot of facts you have to learn by heart, and do not think you have to learn all the different names and all family links. Just read and enjoy! If you get so enthusiastic that you want to read it over and over again, you will by your self learn all names, geographic places and so on.

But the important part is to read it because it is a book of beautiful stories!
Lucy_Took
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Post RE: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: January 20, 2010 09:08
*Dittos OB*

I read it in about a week,because I just went straight though,treated it like a novel and heavily relied on the index to remind me of names I forgot.

Honestly,I only remember the parts I really liked(The Valar and Beren and Luthien mostly...),and that's OK,that's what re-reading's for.

Just about to start my first re-read!
Findhoem
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Post RE: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: March 01, 2010 03:33
I started to read the book 3 times. When I remembered the main characters, it went much more easier. I read "Silmarillion" and loved the book. Some of my friends think, that Tolkien described the full history of Earth. Professor is not simple as he seems.

I haven't read the book in English, but I was charmed. The style of language is beautiful. Thanks to the translators.

There are some moments in a famous trilogy which are hard to understand without reading "Silmarillion".
idhreniel_the_wise
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Post RE: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: March 05, 2010 07:49
Just try to read a bit each night, refer to the family trees and map and you should be fine
hodekin
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Post RE: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: May 06, 2010 04:29
Skip the 1st chapter entirely and get into the story line.

After a few chapters, go back and read the first...it may make more sense then!


Hodekin
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Post RE: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: May 28, 2010 10:51
No, read the first, then go back and read it again!

It makes absolutely no sense the first time through, but the second time through you'll get it.

It would be so much better to be learning this history next year instead of 9th grade World History
Image If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin
RimmoldadTheWizard
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: March 06, 2012 09:38
I just started reading the Silmarilion and I get upset whenever something happens. I thought Maedhros, Fingolfin, Finrod Felagund, Fingon, and Turgon were awesome.
Braewyn
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: April 02, 2012 08:11
Hi, I'm very new to this site! I've just finished reading The Silmarillion, and I wondered if anyone knew, or noticed, that some of the Elves have names which are later given to men during the Third Age, ie. Denethor and Ecthelion, and if anyone knew the reason for this?
Elthir
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: April 03, 2012 08:09
Hi Braewyn, and welcome.

About the names: I think this echoes the Primary World in general, where names survive for many many years, although sometimes altered a bit over time, or as they 'pass through' different languages; and can be adopted for a variety of reasons. The Dunedain used Quenya and Sindarin names (or Sindarin in form), as we can see from the list of rulers in Appendix A.

Externally speaking, Tolkien sometimes reused names for convenience.

One possible external factor might be: at the time Tolkien chose certain names for The Lord of the Rings anyway, it wasn't entirely certain that the legends of the Elder Days were ever going to be published, and this would be a way to get some already existing names into print that JRRT simply liked, and which could be explained as borrowings if the Silmarillion was ever published.

Tolkien did note that the name Glorfindel was not to be imagined as a repeated name, although generally speaking, Elves could reuse names as well.
dfneilso
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: September 07, 2012 07:01
Quote from IAJ92 on May 9, 2008, 13:20
Has anyone here heard of the Kalevala? Probably not if you aren't on the ninth grade in a Finnish school and are being forced to read the Finnish national epic, like me. It's been said that Tolkien has taken influence of Finnish culture and language, but when I had to read some pieces of Kalevala at school, I realised that it sounds exactly like Silmarillion! There was the whole singing thing in the beginning of the world and something about a stolen treasure and all. I think it's possible to read some of it on the internet, as probably those who are obsessed about Silmarillion would be interested to see where Tolkien got his inspiration... And those who don't understand Finnish but know some Quenya, would probably be astounded by the similiarity between them. Now I'm really beginning to be proud of my nationality... I'm boasting here about having read something that Tolkien used as his inspiration, and then I'll go boasting to my Finnish teacher having read something that was influenced by Kalevala This is so cool

Actually if you look at Quenya it's been found to be derived/inspired by Finnish so perhaps you should try that lol. Sindarin on the other hand was inspired by welsh and other gaelic languages. As for the Silmarillion, just take your time You have to remember this is millenia of history you're reading and years of work from Tolkien don't be afraid to flip back and look at connections either
cirdaneth
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: September 07, 2012 10:03
Absolutely, dfneilso. The Silmarillion resembles a collection of essays on myth, legend and history covering 10,000 years from the creation to the start of the Fourth Age. Any part of it could have been expanded into a full-scale novel.

As for the Kalevala, and Tolkien's interest in language, he was intrigued by the apparent gulf between the Finno-Ugric languages, and the Indo-European ones. He invented Quenya and Sindarin as models, to see how their differing structures might be related. In doing so he realised that languages evolve with the experiences of those who speak them, so he had to invent a history for their peoples as well. Thus the complex legendarium grew, and the languages developed various dialects. If you're really interested in this and can get hold of David Salo's "Gateway to Sindarin" you are in for a treat.
dfneilso
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: September 07, 2012 10:19
Thanks for that cirdaneth I will have to look for that now! I'm currently working on Sindarin via the council site and am thinking about learning irish to compare it for fun lol. I've also considered trying to work on some of tolkiens unfinished stories (those he mentioned but never actually wrote) and even starting my own world ( a very daunting task I must say)
tarcolan
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: September 08, 2012 01:33
I think Sindarin was influenced by Welsh, not Irish, dfneilso. I could be wrong.
If anyone's curious the Kalevala is available to download free from the Guttenburg project or manybooks, and no doubt a lot of other places. You'd have to learn Finnish to get the feel of it though, English translations can't really do it justice. So much of a language is in the sound and rhythm.
Turin175
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: November 17, 2012 06:30
First time I read The Silmarillion I was pretty confused but I was studying it and filled out a composition note book like I have done so many times before with The Hobbit and Trilogy. I wanted a better understanding of it so I read it again and listened to an audio recording at the same time following along with it. I got an understanding the second time around and learned how to annunciate the names of characters,places and words in general. I then went back for a third time round and actually remembered the stories quite well. My favorites are Narn I Hurin: The Tale of the Children of Hurin, and the Tale of Beren and Luthien.(audio recording found on YouTube)
Cillendor
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: January 08, 2013 11:05
Turin175, did you know that i narn i chîn Húrin is also published separately as a novel? It's called The Children of Húrin, and it expands greatly on the story from what is in The Silmarillion.
Lindarielwen
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: April 16, 2013 08:49
I have just finished reading The Silmarillion for the fourth time. The first three times, I read it by myself. This last time, I read it with someone and it was so much easier having another person to discuss it with. It took us almost 5 months to read at a chapter each week. Find a book buddy....someone who is well versed in Tolkien is helpful...actually, it's really great... but not necessary.
My destiny is riding again, rolling in the rain, unwinding in the wind. My destiny is fighting again, secretly unwinding..what it was I was supposed to say...to say to you today.
cirdaneth
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: April 17, 2013 03:38
What an excellent idea.
Lindarielwen
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Post Re: The Silmarillion: Help!
on: April 17, 2013 09:41
It worked out very well. The hardest part was being here at the same time due to different time zones.
My destiny is riding again, rolling in the rain, unwinding in the wind. My destiny is fighting again, secretly unwinding..what it was I was supposed to say...to say to you today.
Duvainor
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on: May 04, 2013 12:14
I am reading the Silmarillion for the first time and at the beginning I was struggling because there are so many names introduced all at the same time. After I started looking at maps and "family trees" of all the characters I got a much better understanding.
Lindarielwen
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on: May 04, 2013 08:02
Just take your time and re-read as you go. The maps and family trees are great tools so make use of them. When you are finished reading the book, read it again. It is a wonderful book.
My destiny is riding again, rolling in the rain, unwinding in the wind. My destiny is fighting again, secretly unwinding..what it was I was supposed to say...to say to you today.
Lastiel Rusc
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on: May 08, 2013 08:59
What I tend to do when I start to read the Silmarillion, is I read a bit and set it down. Keep on doing that until I'm done, so that way I'm taking my time. And then I'll pick it up again later on and read it more for the information rather than leisure. (sp?)
'If they have a fault it is distrust of strangers. Though their magic was strong even in those days they were wary. They differed from the High Elves of the West, and were more dangerous and less wise.' ~ Flies and Spiders The Hobbit
Taug anin ú-daug.
_Mebedir_
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on: May 10, 2013 10:27
I'm reading through this with a friend who's never read it before. I was wondering what people thought about skipping the chapter "Of Turin Turambar" and replacing it with the 2007 Children of Hurin? It's been a while since I've read either so I'm not sure if you would actually "lose" any of the story from the Sil by doing that. My understanding is that they're both the same and the stand-alone book is just expanded upon, so I thought it could be more enjoyable for him to have the full story than the shortened version.
Dolwen
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on: May 11, 2013 05:36
It has been a while since I have read the version in The Sil but I know that certain facts are left out such as the fate of Morwen but for a first time reading, I'd probably still recommend just reading the Sil as it stands first since there is so much information to absorb. The Children of Hurin is definitely the fuller version (also found in Unfinished Tales) but maybe reading it on its own after if there is an interest would be better.

As a side note, this site has a Silmarillion Survival Guide that may be of help to your friend. Just hover over Elrond's Library on the Main Menu. Good luck with your reading.
PSK
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on: May 12, 2013 05:58
Only tip is if you dont understand something read it again and again. It is very biblical, but if your reading it without any prior knowledge of Middle Earth I wouldnt worry about understanding any of the geography or refrences to other books.
"Tears unnumbered ye shall shed; and the Valar will fence Valinor against you, and shut you out, so that not even the echo of your lamentation shall pass over the mountains." ~ The Doom of Mandos
tarcolan
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on: May 12, 2013 09:21
I think a large wall map of the ancient world would be very handy. I always get lost with all the place names. I don't know if there is one for sale so I might make one before I tackle the Sil again.
LegolasXXXXX
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on: May 12, 2013 10:15
I've found that by reading the Silmarillion many times, I've become pretty familiar with alot of the mentioned places. Plus the fact that I like to pour over Tolkien's maps. Anyway, a large map would be nice tho.
Lindarielwen, I hope that wherever you are it is incredible and filled with all the things that you love. Looking forward to our next meeting.
Lindarielwen
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on: May 12, 2013 08:40
There ia a wonderful book called, The Atlas of Middle-earth by Karen Wynn Fonstad, It is a very informative and interesting book.
My destiny is riding again, rolling in the rain, unwinding in the wind. My destiny is fighting again, secretly unwinding..what it was I was supposed to say...to say to you today.
Gandolorin
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on: May 11, 2014 05:17
Yes, it was published in 1981, an updated version after the first eight books of HoME in 1991. I have a 1992 paperback version, so I'm not sure if it is still on sale or in print. The Wikipedia article seems to be silent on that subject.
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Evil~Shieldmaiden
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on: May 11, 2014 08:11
It is still available, Gando. I recently purchased a soft cover copy through Amazon.
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tarcolan
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on: May 12, 2014 11:19
Only available in the U.S. and Amazon won't tell you the shipping cost until you've entered all your bank card details. I got mine s/h.
Lord_Sauron
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on: May 13, 2014 05:13
I found The Atlas of Middle-earth on ebay.
Bad Luck Turin
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on: July 01, 2014 02:47
The Silmarillion took me soooo long to read, definitely the hardest one in my opinion. I kept on stopping in the middle of a section, leaving it for a bit and then when I came back not remembering what was happening and having to start again. (this happened like 3 times for Túrin)
Bill the Pony
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on: January 22, 2015 01:32
The Silmarilion is an essential book to read for a Lord of the Rings lover because it allows you to fully appreciate the rich history that is mentioned in the trilogy!
The Lady Idril
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on: August 11, 2015 11:15
When I read The Silmarillion, I first read the book all the way through, but didn't comprehend anything. Still, reading it all the way through was sort of a confidence boost which was nice. Then I read an internet summary written by Dawn Felagund

(http://www.silmarillionwritersguild.org/reference/silmsummaries/home.php)

which helped a lot. I read it once through, then I read it again, this time writing my own summary

(http://loveroflembas.blogspot.com/2015/06/the-silmarillion-group-read-part-i.html).

I then re-read both Dawn Felagund's summary and my own, then re-read The Silmarillion, this time with a deeper notion of what was going on. It took me three months, but I am so grateful that I went through with it! The Silmarillion is the best book I have ever read.
The Lady Idril, Princess of Gondolin, Este Realm Member, www.loveroflembas.blogspot.com
Mironiel_EA
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on: November 15, 2015 12:23
I read it after I read LOTR because I was in 'post-LOTR depression' and desperately needed more Tolkien. I think I read it in like a week, not even. The beginning was a bit tough to read, but once the elves came into the story it was plain sailing after that. It's totally worth reading, even if it's harder to read than LOTR or The Hobbit.
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