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Great Angemon
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Post FInally back on track, but needing confirmation
on: November 12, 2014 09:40
Alright, so, I finally have a base that I'm proud of for my conlang (not to mention that it's taken me several failed attempts and lots of wasted paper), and I wanted to know if it makes sense as a grammar.

Sounds: v, s, sh, n, l, t, k, a, e, o

Stress is placed on the first syllable of a word when k or sh is the first sound of the word; otherwise, the stress is on the last syllable.

Words are formed by forming syllables with a vowel and one or two consonants. Consonants cannot follow consonants, and vowels cannot follow vowels. The first vowel must be an a, excepting prefixes.

s becomes sh when at the beginning of a word, or when used in a prefix, though it is still written as s.

Prefixes are used to denote tense. Suffixes are used to denote pluralization and case, and to turn nouns into verbs.

Word order is OSV.

If there is a doubled consonantal or vowel sound due to an affix, the sound from the affix becomes silent, though it is still written.

Any and all help would be very much appreciated
dirk_math
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on: November 13, 2014 02:50
This is a very good start!
Yassë engë lómë, anarties calali.
Great Angemon
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on: November 13, 2014 09:41
Thank you! I'm glad to know I'm finally doing something right.

Can you possibly give me any advice on word building? I don't really like how word generators don't include grammar, because it means I have to be really picky about the words I get to use from them, but I also don't like making the words by hand, because they all seem to similar.
dirk_math
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on: November 13, 2014 01:29
As an example of a language that is very keen on prefixes and postfixes, I suggest you have a look at Georgian (the language of Georgia in the Kaukasus): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgian_grammar

By having so many prefixes and postfixes, you only need a few roots to express a lot.

A language that takes the prefix and postfix idea to the extreme is the conlang Esperanto. That language doesn't have a word for e.g. 'bad' because it use malbona, bona means 'good' and the prefix mal- means: change into the inverse meaning.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esperanto_vocabulary
Yassë engë lómë, anarties calali.
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