Welcome Guest 

Register

Author Topic:
PotbellyHairyfoot
Grandpa Moderator
Posts: 2929
Send Message
Avatar
Post Chapter VI, Turin Among The Outlaws
on: October 01, 2007 12:30
1) What type of men are the Gaurwaith, and should Turin have joined them?

2)What were the costs, to Turin, the Gaurwaith, and to the Elves of Doriath, of Turin joining the Gaurwauth. Who gained and who lost, by Turin's choices?

3) What does Turin finally do to show some of the wisdom he should have, as the son of a leader of men? Does he do enough?

4) Why, do you think, does Turin not remember Nellas, the Elf-maiden who spoke to Thingol in his defense?
Dolwen
Store Admin & Head Weaver of Vairë
Posts: 13768
Send Message
Avatar
Post RE: Chapter VI, Turin Among The Outlaws
on: October 09, 2007 03:22
1) What type of men are the Gaurwaith, and should Turin have joined them?
The Gaurwaith were outlaws who had no compassion or caring for anyone other than themselves. They killed innocent people for their own gain. Turin should not have joined them but went on his way. If he wouldn't have joined them his heart may not have hardened so much. He also would have been more likely to go back to Doriath when Beleg found him.

2)What were the costs, to Turin, the Gaurwaith, and to the Elves of Doriath, of Turin joining the Gaurwauth. Who gained and who lost, by Turin's choices?
To Turin the cost was the hardening of his heart, bitterness and resentment. His choice kept him from returning to Doriath. The elves of Doriath were without the strength of Turin and because of Beleg's love for Turin they were without him too. I would say that the ones who gained most were the Gaurwaith because Turin knew how to keep them alive and safe in the wilderness and gave them a strength on their side that few could match.

3) What does Turin finally do to show some of the wisdom he should have, as the son of a leader of men? Does he do enough?
He helps stop the needless attack of innocent people by killing the old captain and taking the men under his service. He moves them out of the lands of men. But he still let them live in their evil ways until Beleg. Then he finally shows great leadership by saying them will no longer harm and but orcs.

4) Why, do you think, does Turin not remember Nellas, the Elf-maiden who spoke to Thingol in his defense?
I am not sure, but I notice that Turin says a mist lies over his youth. Maybe this is part of the curse of Morgoth, that he quickly forgets anything good in his life. Possibly the pain of leaving his mother and having her refuse to join him has caused him to block out those painful times.


Members Online
Print Friendly, PDF & Email